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Lenny Fukshansky

October 2018

The Bateman—Horn Conjecture, Part I: heuristic derivation (Stephan Garcia, Pomona)

October 16, 2018 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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The Bateman—Horn Conjecture is a far-reaching statement about the distribution of the prime numbers.  It implies many known results, such as the Green—Tao theorem, and a variety of famous conjectures, such as the Twin Prime Conjecture.  In this expository talk, we start from basic principles and provide a heuristic argument in favor of the conjecture.  This talk should be accessible to undergraduates with a background in modular arithmetic.

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November 2018

Weil sums of binomials: properties and applications (Daniel Katz, CSUN)

November 27, 2018 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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We consider sums in which an additive character of a finite field F is applied to a binomial whose individual terms (monomials) become permutations of F when regarded as functions.  These Weil sums characterize the nonlinearity of power permutations of interest in cryptography.  They also tell us about the correlation of linear recursive sequences over finite fields that are used in digital communications and remote sensing.  In these applications, one is interested in the spectrum of Weil sum values that are obtained as the coefficients in the…

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December 2018

Sperner’s lemma: generalizations and applications (Oleg Musin, UT Rio Grande Valley)

December 4, 2018 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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The classical Sperner -  KKM (Knaster - Kuratowski - Mazurkiewicz) lemma has many applications  in combinatorics, algorithms, game theory and mathematical economics. In this talk we consider generalizations of this lemma as well as Gale's colored KKM lemma and Shapley's KKMS theorem. It is shown that spaces and covers can be much more general and the boundary KKM rules can be substituted by more weaker boundary assumptions. These generalizations of Sperner's lemma rely on homotopy invariants of covers  that in…

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January 2019

Niebrzydowski tribrackets and algebras (Sam Nelson, CMC)

January 22 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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In this talk we will survey recent work on Niebzydowski Tribrackets and Niebrydowski Algebras, algebraic structures related to region colorings the planar complements of knots and trivalent spatial graphs.

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Discrete compressed sensing: lattices and frames (Josiah Park, Georgia Tech)

January 29 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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Lattice valued vector systems have taken an important role in packing, coding, cryptography, and signal processing problems.  In compressed sensing, improvements in sparse recovery methods can be reached with an additional  assumption that the signal of  interest is lattice  valued, as demonstrated by A.  Flinth  and G. Kutyniok. Equiangular  tight  frames are  particular systems  of unit  vectors  with minimal  coherence,  a measure of how well distributed the vectors are, and have provable guarantees for recovery of sparse vectors in standard…

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February 2019

Subgraph statistics (Benny Sudakov, ETH Zurich)

February 12 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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Given integers $k,l$  and a graph $G$, how large can be the fraction of $k$-vertex subsets of $G$ which span exactly $l$ edges?  The systematic study of this very natural  question  was recently initiated by Alon, Hefetz, Krivelevich and Tyomkyn who also proposed several interesting conjectures on this topic. In this talk we discuss a theorem which proves one of their conjectures and implies an asymptotic version of another.  We also make some first steps towards analogous question for hypergraphs. Our proofs involve…

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Knowledge, strategies, and know-how (Pavel Naumov, CMC)

February 19 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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An agent comes to a fork in a road. There is a sign that says that one of the two roads leads to prosperity and another to death. The agent must take the fork, but she does not know which road leads where. Does the agent have a strategy to get to prosperity? On one hand, since one of the roads leads to prosperity, such a strategy clearly exists. On the other, the agent does not know what the strategy…

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When is the product of Siegel eigenforms an eigenform? (Jim Brown, Occidental College)

February 26 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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Modular forms are ubiquitous in modern number theory.  For instance, showing that elliptic curves are secretly modular forms was the key to the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem.  In addition to number theory, modular forms show up in diverse areas such as coding theory and particle physics.  Roughly speaking, a modular form is a complex-valued function defined on the complex upper half-plane that satisfies a large number of symmetries.  A modular form has two invariants: weight and level.  If one…

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March 2019

Nonvanishing minors and uncertainty principles for Fourier analysis over finite fields (Daniel Katz, CSUN)

March 5 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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Chebotarev's theorem on roots of unity says that every minor of a discrete Fourier transform matrix of prime order is nonzero. We present a generalization of this result that includes analogues for discrete cosine and discrete sine transform matrices as special cases.  This leads to a generalization of the Biro-Meshulam-Tao uncertainty principle to functions with symmetries that arise from certain group actions, with some of the simplest examples being even and odd functions.  This new uncertainty principle gives a bound…

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Indiana Pols Forced to Eat Humble Pi: The Curious History of an Irrational Number (Edray Goins, Pomona)

March 12 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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In 1897, Indiana physician Edwin J. Goodwin believed he had discovered a way to square the circle, and proposed a bill to Indiana Representative Taylor I. Record which would secure Indiana's the claim to fame for his discovery.  About the time the debate about the bill concluded, Purdue University professor Clarence A. Waldo serendipitously came across the claimed discovery, and pointed out its mathematical impossibility to the lawmakers.  It had only be shown just 15 years before, by the German…

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Refinements of metrics (Wai Yan Pong, CSUDH)

March 26 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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I will talk about a few graph-theoretic metrics then introduce the concept of refinements on a class of functions that include all metrics. As a case study, we will construct various refinements on the shortest-path distance. Consequently, we obtain a few "better" versions of the Erdos number. In the course of our investigation, we realized various construction of metrics can be unified under a rather natural concept that we called monotonic monoid norm. This is a joint work with Kayla Lock and Alex…

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April 2019

Fibonacci and Lucas analogues of binomial coefficients and what they count (Curtis Bennett, CSULB)

April 2 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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A Fibonomial is what is obtained when you replace each term of the binomial coefficients $ {n \choose k}$ by the corresponding Fibonacci number.  For example, the Fibonomial $${ 6\brace 3 } = \frac{F_6 \cdot F_5 \cdot \dots \cdot F_1}{(F_3\cdot F_2 \cdot F_1)(F_3\cdot F_2 \cdot F_1)} = \frac{8\cdot5\cdot3\cdot2\cdot1\cdot1}{(2\cdot1\cdot1)(2\cdot1\cdot1)} = 60$$ since the first six Fibonacci numbers are 1, 1, 2, 2, 5, and 8.  Curiously the Fibonomials are always integers, raising the combinatorial question:  what do they count?  In this…

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Matrix multiplication: the hunt for $\omega$ (Mark Huber, CMC)

April 9 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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For centuries finding the determinant of a matrix was considered to be something that took $\Theta(n^3)$ steps.  Only in 1969 did Strassen discover that there was a faster method.  In this talk I'll discuss his finding, how the Master Theorem for divide-and-conquer plays into it, and how it was shown that finding determinants, inverting matrices, and Gaussian elimination are the same time complexity as to matrix multiplication.

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Chow rings of heavy/light Hassett spaces via tropical geometry (Dagan Karp, HMC)

April 16 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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In this talk, I will try to give a fun introduction to tropical geometry and Hassett spaces, and show how tropical geometry can be used to compute the Chow rings of Hassett spaces combinatorially. This is joint work with Siddarth Kannan and Shiyue Li.

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Theory of vertex Ho-Lee-Schur graphs (Sin-Min Lee, SJSU)

April 23 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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A triple of natural numbers (a,b,c) is an S-set if a+b=c. I. Schur used the S-sets to show that for n >3, there exists s(n) such that for prime p > s(n), x^p + y^p = z^p (mod p) has a nontrivial solution. A (p,q)-graph G is said to be vertex Ho-Lee-Schur graph if there exists a bijection f: V(G) --> {1,2,…,p} such that for each C3 subgraph of G with vertices {x,y,z} the triple (f(x),f(y),f(z)) is an S-set. The VHLS deficiency of…

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What Did Ada Do? Digging into the Mathematical Work of Ada Lovelace (Gizem Karaali, Pomona)

April 30 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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Augusta Ada Byron King Lovelace (1815-1852) is today celebrated as the first computer programmer in history. This might be confusing to some because in 1852 there were no machines that looked like what we call computers today. In this talk I attempt to explain what Ada really did, and delineate the mathematics involved. Bernoulli numbers will definitely come into play, but there may also be other fun distractions along the way, possibly including some juicy gossip about Ada’s life.

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May 2019

Notions of stability in algebraic geometry (Jason Lo, CSUN)

May 7 @ 12:15 pm - 1:10 pm
Millikan 2099, Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave.
Claremont, CA 91711 United States
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One of the main drivers of current research in geometry is the classification of Calabi-Yau threefolds.  Towards this effort, a particular approach in algebraic geometry is via the study of stability conditions.  In this talk, I will explain what constitutes a notion of stability in algebraic geometry, and what the challenges are in studying them.

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