DHarmony expands Digital Humanities at the Claremont Colleges, sees launch of the DH Studio

DH Harmony Poster

Aptly named DHarmony merged various Digital Humanities activities at Claremont Colleges Library and Digital Humanities at the Claremont Colleges (DH@CC) into a single-day event on April 8th. In the morning, Digital Scholarship Librarian Ashley Sanders provided an overview of Digital Humanities to faculty, staff, and graduate students in attendance at this new event which replaces last year’s Spring DH Symposium. The morning’s featured speakers were Occidental Center for Digital Liberal Arts Director Daniel Chamberlain and Music Assistant Professor Shanna Lorenz, who provided all in attendance a detailed set of examples from Occidental’s successful digital scholarship program. Wrapping up the morning were project reports from Claremont Colleges faculty, showcasing the ways in which technology is aiding research, writing, and publication at the colleges

The afternoon saw the first official activity in the new DH Studio on the 3rd floor of the Claremont Colleges Library. A Scalar workshop, provided by ANVC/Scalar Program Manager Curtis Fletcher, demonstrated the award winning publishing platform to new users and featured the first use of The Studio’s new 70-inch interactive display. The afternoon finished with a mixer, introducing faculty interested in DH methods to experts and resources at the Library and DH@CC.

With the success of DHarmony the growing Digital Humanities community at the Claremont Colleges looks forward to further activities that make up “DH Month” in April.

Apply for the 2016 Digital Humanities Summer Institute!

The Summer Institute is an immersive, week long experience for faculty who are interested in learning more about what digital humanities is, understanding critical debates in and around digital humanities, and how to understand and use digital tools. There is a $1,000 stipend for attending. The 2016 DH Summer Institute will be held from May 23, 2016-May 27, 2016.

Throughout the week participants can expect a wide selection of presentations and hands-on sessions led by scholars working at the forefront of the digital humanities. Key topics at the symposium will include: discussions regarding the definition of the digital humanities and its uses, DH criticism, the advantages to infusing humanities courses with the digital, and controversies in the field. Hands-on sessions focused on getting started with tools such as Omeka, Scalar, video production and post production, mapping, and GIS.

Application is closed

The deadline to apply is Sunday, March 13, 2016.
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Apply for the 2016 Digital Course Development Grant Cycle!

As the DH@CC Mellon grant is focused largely on pedagogy, one of its major activities is Digital Course Development. The DH@CC initiative offers competitive Digital Course Development grants of $6,000 to 5C professors who will use the funds to develop or redesign courses that focus on or make use of digital tools. The grant cycles will take place over three years and result in a robust offering of up to 25 DH courses which will be taught at least twice during the life of the DH@CC Mellon grant.

Faculty who are awarded Digital Course Development grants may also apply for funds to hire undergraduate or graduate student assistants to collaborate with. With the help of the Honnold Library staff, students and faculty will together design and implement digital media projects that further enable their DH courses to succeed in the classroom.

Application is closed

The deadline to apply is Sunday, March 13, 2016.
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Coming Soon: Tool Shed at the Honnold Library

Curious about Google Glass, Arduino, data visualization, or how to create multimedia projects? Wish to augment your technical knowledge when creating digital humanities projects? The Digital Tool Shed can help!

In addition to the makeover planned for the Digital Humanities Studio, the GIS Lab at the Honnold Library is going to be renovated over Summer, 2016, to provide an accessible, technology-rich, inviting space for the Claremont Colleges community to explore digital research tools. Experts in various technologies will be on hand to answer questions and provide tutorials, workshops, and consultations. This space will also available for professors, librarians, and graduate students to try out innovative pedagogy in a technology-rich active learning center, and it will provide the perfect showcase to present digital projects, unique primary sources, and more!

Conveniently located down the hall in the Library, the Tool Shed will be the primary partner facility of the Digital Humanities Studio for supporting multimedia-centered student and scholarly production. The Tool Shed will include flexible furniture, hardware, such as DSLR cameras & kits on loan, a “green screen”, post-production software, data analysis software, and a data visualization wall. Plans for an audio studio and oral history recording studio are also in the works.

Have questions? Please contact Ashley Sanders at ashley_sanders@cuc.claremont.edu.

Scripps Humanities Institute 2016: Interventions and Resistance

Our colleagues at the Scripps College Humanities Institute have put together their 2016 program of lectures, performances, and workshops around the important topic of violence against races, classes, and genders in the U.S. From their site:

“As agents of greater change, they further the urgent and necessary work of dismantling systems of inequality and social injustice and provide us with pathway to how activism and social justice can better shape our world.”

The workshops are limited to Scripps students (with reservation required), but the rest are mostly free and open to the public. There will certainly a variety of content to stimulate potential digital projects for Claremont Colleges students and beyond. Full info at: https://www.scrippscollege.edu/hi/2016-spring.

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© 2019 Digital Humanities at The Claremont Colleges.
Unless otherwise indicated, all materials licensed by the CC 4.0 BY-NC License.

DH@CC has been made possible through a generous grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.