Podcasting

Podcasting has become a popular form of knowledge sharing and storytelling in our digital age. The DH@CC Team believes that humanists have a professional responsibility to share our expertise beyond the academy, and podcasting is one easy way to make sure that our scholarship has the potential to reach diverse, public audiences.

For more information about podcasting support for your research or classes, or to set up a consultation, contact the DH@CC Team.


Quick Links

DH@CC Quick Guide to Podcasting: A Google Docs copy of the Quick Guide provided on this page.

DH@CC Quick Guide to Audacity – A tutorial for Audacity created by the DH@CC Team.

DH@CC Quick Guide to WeVideo – A tutorial for WeVideo created by the DH@CC Team.


Last Updated: 6 April 2020

Quick Guide to Podcasting

What is a Podcast?

A podcast is a series of spoken word, audio episodes that a listener can download to a personal device or stream for easy listening. A podcast episode usually features one or more hosts leading a discussion about a particular topic.

Podcasting has become a popular form of knowledge sharing and storytelling in our digital age. The DH@CC Team believes that humanists have a professional responsibility to share our expertise beyond the academy, and podcasting is one easy way to make sure that our scholarship has the potential to reach diverse, public audiences.

Getting Started

When preparing to launch a podcast series or record a specific episode, it’s useful to consider some of the following questions:

  • Why are you making your podcast? What are your short-term goals? What are your long-term goals?
  • What’s your favorite podcast? Why is it your favorite? What are some of the features that you like most about it? Could it serve as a model for the podcast you’d like to launch?
  • Who are you making your podcast for? Who is your primary audience? Who are your secondary audiences? 
  • Why should people listen to your podcast? What valuable information are you offering to your listeners?

Format

Choosing a format for your podcast is highly personal and depends on how you want to deliver information to your listeners. You don’t have to stick to a single format for every episode in your series. You might get comfortable with one particular format or you might mix it up. It’s really up to you to decide how creative you’d like to get.

A few common formats for podcasts include:

  • Solo-cast – A host delivers a monologue (e.g.: The Anthropocene Reviewed).
  • Co-hosted – Content provided by more than one host, usually in conversation with one another (e.g.: Stuff You Should Know).
  • One-on-one interview – A host invites a guest to share expertise and/or experiences (e.g.: Ologies).
  • Other formats – Roundtable or panel discussion; fictional or non-fiction storytelling; pre-recorded or repurposed content; hybrid; etc.

Recommended Equipment

Hardware

  • Microphone – While it’s possible to record audio with a computer or phone, note that the better your microphone, the better the quality of your recording. Microphones are available for checkout from The Claremont Colleges Library’s Tech Lending Program.
  • Computer or tablet – Necessary for editing.

Editing Software Options

  • Audacity – A free, open source, cross-platform audio editing application. 
  • Avid Pro Tools – The industry standard for audio editing; free at the most basic level, but quite pricey if you need access to more advanced features. 
  • GarageBand – A free, easy to use, audio editing platform for Mac devices.
  • WeVideo – A free, browser-based collaborative video editing platform that can also easily be used to edit podcasts.

Scripting

Before you begin recording, you’ll want to prepare an invisible script with bullet points of things you’ll be discussing in your podcast episode. A great way to start drafting your invisible script is by mapping out the structure of your episode (e.g.: welcome message; introduction of topic and purpose; details about the purpose; and closing remark with the main takeaway of the episode). 

Keep in mind that a podcast is not an audiobook. Given the intimate nature of podcasting, you’ll want to write a script that is intended to be heard rather than read. Your script should therefore come across as organic and conversational, rather than formal and stiff. In other words, script the way you talk.

Editing

Once you’ve finished recording your podcast episode, it’s time for editing. Editing allows you to remove mistakes, stitch together different audio clips, add music or sound effects, etc. For more information about using WeVideo to edit your podcast episode, check out the DH@CC Quick Guide to WeVideo. For more information about using Audacity to edit your podcast episode, check out the DH@CC Quick Guide to Audacity

Publishing

Once you’ve recorded and edited your podcast episode, to get it out there for everyone to hear, you’ll need to sign up for an account with a Podcast Hosting Service. Podcast Hosting Services store your audio files and allow your audience to listen, download, and subscribe to your podcast. It is recommended that you consider using a variety of Podcast Hosting Services to reach a broad range of listeners.

Some popular hosts include:

  • Buzzsprout – User friendly; free option with recording limits.
  • Captivate – Professional, but pricey.
  • SoundCloud – Free option with recording limits.

Stay tuned for information about hosting through The Claremont Colleges Library.

Additional Resources

How to Make a Podcast – A step-by-step guide from Buzzsprout.

Podcasting Step by Step – A podcast about starting a podcast – so meta!

DH@CC Quick Guide to Audacity – A tutorial for Audacity created by the DH@CC Team.

DH@CC Quick Guide to WeVideo – A tutorial for WeVideo created by the DH@CC Team.

DH@CC Quick Guide to Podcasting – A Google Docs copy of the Quick Guide

LICENSING
© 2020 Digital Humanities at The Claremont Colleges.
Unless otherwise indicated, all materials licensed by the CC 4.0 BY-NC License.

DH@CC has been made possible through a generous grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.